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celebrate easter

Fun Ways To Celebrate Easter With Your Dog

With Easter soon approaching, you may be wondering what you can do to celebrate and include your dog in the festivities. While we need to be cautious with our canines around the sweet treats, plastic eggs and plastic grass, there are still plenty of ways to include your pooch in the fun.

Fun Ways To Celebrate Easter With Your Dog

celebrate easter

#1 -Dress Your Dog Up!

We’ve all seen those adorable pictures with furry friends wearing costumes, right?  This is a great way to include your dog in the Easter fun, if he will tolerate being dressed up. You can outfit him in a full costume, like an Easter bunny, a baby chick ,or maybe just a head piece.

You could even put a little necktie scarf or bow tie on him. The choices really are endless! If that isn’t working for him, how about a fun collar or bow attached in Easter colors or styles?

#2 – Yummy Dog-Friendly Easter Treats

This is where you need to be careful, but of course there are plenty of Easter treats fit for your dog. You can give him any of his regular treats, but make it special by feeding him from a pet-safe Easter basket.

Safe means no plastic grass, plastic eggs, or chocolate.

While hard boiled eggs won’t hurt him, be careful not to give him too many. Also make sure they are fresh and haven’t been sitting out too long. Doggies can have sensitive digestive tracts when it comes to “people” food.

There are plenty of veggies you can feed your dog too. Potatoes, asparagus, broccoli, brussel sprouts, carrots, cauliflower, cucumbers. Fruits are okay too, such as watermelon, strawberries, oranges and blueberries. Fruits with pits should be avoided.

As with any treats, we don’t want to overfeed Fido, but he can enjoy a moderate amount safely.

#3 – Have A Dog-Friendly Easter Egg Hunt

Including your dog in an Easter egg hunt is perfectly fine if you follow a few safety precautions:

  • Keep him away from plastic grass
  • Keep him away from chocolate
  • Don’t let him chew on any plastic eggs, only hardboiled and only when fresh
  • Any fabric-stuffed chew toys should be pet safe
  • Don’t overfeed veggies or fruit, but he can enjoy in moderation
  • Count the number of eggs you have hidden so you know none are left to rot or to be found by Fido after Easter
  • Be careful of small plastic toys, you don’t want doggie to eat anything that might hurt his insides

One way to look at safety for your dog at Easter time is to think of him like a toddler. You wouldn’t want to give your toddler anything unsafe to eat or chew, or in excess amounts.

With these ideas in mind, you can have a safe and pleasant Easter with your dog and family.

Plus, be sure to take pictures of your dog in that Easter costume – We want to see them! It will be a fun memory for you and the kids year after year.

too cold for your dog

When Is It Too Cold For Your Dog?

January may not be the friendliest of months weather-wise, but I guarantee that’s not going to stop your pup from wanting to hit the pavement. Dogs love their exercise and a lot of the time they’re willing to walk, even in harsh conditions. It’s our job, as pet parents, topay special attention to how long is too long to be out in the snow and freezing cold with our dogs. Let’s take a look at a few tell-tale signs that it’s too cold for your dog to be outside.

Symptoms That It’s Too Cold For Your Dog

Dogs are smart, and they know how to communicate with their owners to some degree. So if you’re out on a walk and your dog starts exhibiting signs of discomfort such as whining or shivering, it’s time to head back in.

Other important things to look out for is signs of weakness, like if your pup starts walking more slowly or stops walking entirely. Showing signs of anxiety is another key symptom that your dog is uncomfortable and needs to warm up.

It’s really important not to ignore these symptoms, because just like humans, dogs can develop conditions such as hypothermia or frostbite from staying out in the cold too long.

too cold for your dog

Keep A Good Eye On Their Paws

While dogs are able to let you how they feel through their behavior, you can also tell if it’s too cold for your dog through their physical state. Dogs’ paws are some of the easiest, tell-tale signs that they need to warm up and get out of the cold.

If your dog’s paws seem to be cracking or bleeding, this could definitely be a sign of cold-weather injury. Your dog also might start to slow down or stop walking if they have accumulated too much ice in between their toes.

If your dog shows any of these signs, it’s probably a good idea to get them inside so you can take a closer look. It’s better to be safe than sorry!

 

Know You And Your Dog’s Limits

Humans and animals alike all have their tolerances to cold weather. Just like humans, some dogs do quite well in the cold weather, while others don’t. Usually this can be attributed to the thickness of your dog’s coat, but not always.

So, when you’re walking your dog in the snow, consider factors such as their coat thickness, age, and general health.

A dog with a thick fur coat is most likely going to be more cold weather resistant, and won’t feel the sting of the wind as fast as a dog with a light coat. A dog with a shorter coat will most likely feel the cold faster, and will not be able to be out as long.

Another example is that an elderly dog is probably not going to do as well walking in the snow as a young pup. Your elderly dog could be more prone to slipping, falling, or skidding on ice and snow.

And, if your dog has arthritis, diabetes, or some other condition, they may have more trouble dealing with the cold weather. This is because they might have more difficulty regulating their body temperature, so they can’t adjust to the cold weather as well.

Taking individual factors of your dog into account when out in the cold is crucial. No two dogs are alike. So, if you’re concerned on the appropriate time to stay out in the cold with your dog, make sure you consult your veterinarian.

 

Don’t Forget To Worry About Yourself

What do I mean by this? Well, as most pet owners are, it’s easy to get caught up on what’s best for your dog, and forget about yourself in the process.

So, even if your dog seems to be doing great in the snow, but you feel like your fingers are about to freeze – don’t feel bad about heading back inside. It’s important to be conscientious of your own health and tolerance to the cold.

Your dog’s health is no doubt important, but so is your own! Try to pay attention to both your dog and you own signs of tolerance for the cold. Try to find a happy medium for the two of you, and I guarantee you both will be able to take on the cold like nobody’s business.

 

Fun Ways to Exercise With Your Dog In Cold Weather

Just like humans, dogs need lots of exercise to live a healthy and happy life. In fact, owning a dog is a great way to motivate yourself to go out and get some exercise. Even when the temps are freezing there are still ways to exercise with your dog in cold weather and still keep the blood flowing!

Let’s talk about some creative ways that you and your dog can still get some quality exercise despite cold temperatures.

exercise dog.

Wait to Walk Until the Sun Comes Out To Exercise With Your Dog!

A lot of dog owners like to get up bright and early to take a walk with their pup. But in the Winter time this may not be the best idea, because it’s usually colder in the mornings than the afternoon.

In the winter time, why not wait until the afternoon to take that jog around the block or trip to the park? It will still be cold, but the sun is your friend! It’ll be a little warmer, and easier to see what’s going on outside. Plus, it will make it that much warmer!

You also won’t have to worry about busting out your flashlight in order to see where you’re walking if you exercise your dog at night. Remember that it’s important to be safe while exercising with your dog. Nothing is more important than the safety of you and your pets.

 

Substitute Regular Backyard Playtime for A Trip Around Town!

Although your dog may be totally content with backyard play time and let outs, everyone likes a change in scenery. Why not take your pooch to somewhere fun around town?

This could be a dog park or a hiking trail. Dog parks are great because both you and your dog get to socialize – taking your mind off of the biting cold! Before you know it your dog will be tuckered out after all the running around and games of fetch.

Hiking trails are also awesome exercise opportunities for you and your dog. You’ll get to take in some stunning outdoor scenery while you and your dog build up a sweat. Invite along some friends and their dogs to make this an even more fun-filled event. You would be suprised how many of your friends already exercise with their dog!

 

Snow is GREAT for Hide-N-Seek

We all know that dogs have impeccable noses, so why not use this to get them a work out? Head outside bringing along your dog’s favorite toy, or maybe some treats. Scatter the toys and treats in the snow and let your dog see you do it. Then you can tell your pooch to go and find them!

This a great way to stimulate your dog’s nose while getting them a great workout. Once they bring the toys back to you, you could even turn it into a game of fetch. Your dog will love running after their favorite toy and having to bury their head in the snow to get it.

The possibilities are endless!

Don’t Skip On Exercise, But Know Your Limits

Overall, there are a ton of entertaining ways to get some exercise with your dog in the Winter time in addition to what we listed here.

But it’s important to remember that if the temperature feels too cold for you, it’s probably too cold for your dog. Their fluffy fur coat has its limits as well!

So while you should still try to give your dog as much exercise as possible in the Winter time, keep in mind your own and your dog’s limits. Safety is always #1 priority above everything!